EDUCATIONAL STRATEGIES FOR PERSONALIZED UTONOMOUS LANGUAGE LEARNING INTENSIFICATION AT UNIVERSITIES OF CANADA AND THE USA

Authors

  • Yuliana Lavrysh National Technical University of Ukraine “Igor Sikorsky Kyiv Polytechnic Institute”, Ukraine
  • Iryna Lytovchenko National Technical University of Ukraine “Igor Sikorsky Kyiv Polytechnic Institute”, Ukraine

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.31499/2306-5532.1.2021.243106

Abstract

The paper presents the review of modern educational strategies of personalized learning fostering at universities of Canada and the USA. The development of personalized learning strategies is a complex, multifaceted pedagogical task aimed at implementing strategies for the effective organization of independent self-educational activities for students. Based on scientific literature and educational documentation analysis, it was outlined that portfolios, self-assessment, and self-study centres are considered the most efficient for personalized learning implementation, specifically for foreign language learning. Among the most efficient pedagogical practices, we singled out centres for self-access, self-assessment checklists, peer learning and feedback, pedagogical dialogue. By discourse and content analysis of foreign scientific sources, the specificity of interpretation of concepts "individualization", "personali-zation", "differentiation" is revealed. The personalized learning strategies are imple-mented through individualized, self-instructed, self-directed, self-regulated, student-centred, and independent learning. Studying the foreign experience of personalized learning implementation allows outlining the range of interpretations of this concept, analyzing the genesis of the concept of "personalized learning", and determining didactic conditions and approaches to personalization at universities. The primary purpose of personalized learning is to facilitate language learning through personal learning styles, needs and interests. The most effective way of encouraging teachers to implement personalized instructions is to experience personalized learning and share

 

the positive experience with students. It is determined that personalized learning takes into account each student's educational needs, personal goals, and objectives through a specially organized form of teaching that contributes to the development of lifelong learning.

 

Key words: personalized learning, learner autonomy, language learning, self-assessment, interactive assessment.

 

 

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Published

2021-06-30

How to Cite

Lavrysh, Y., & Lytovchenko, I. (2021). EDUCATIONAL STRATEGIES FOR PERSONALIZED UTONOMOUS LANGUAGE LEARNING INTENSIFICATION AT UNIVERSITIES OF CANADA AND THE USA. Studies in Comparative Education, (1), 43–52. https://doi.org/10.31499/2306-5532.1.2021.243106

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Section

LANGUAGE LEARNING